Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Venting

I read a lot of blogs. I've narrowed myself down to the ones that don't drive me insane. The ones that drive me insane are usually feminist drivel from Muslimahs that want to put gender before Islam and announce it to the world through their pretentious articles written on topics that only degrade women, not lift them up.

Most of the blogs I read are by intelligent Muslim women who are strict on their deen. They are strong, smart and knowledgeable about Islam. These are the sisters that I take comfort in. We share ideals and learn from each other. These are the things that keep me going. Knowing there are sisters out there that think like I do and support me as I support them.

Now comes the venting part. I know that my viewpoints are considered 'strict' to some, but it drives me crazy to no end when people try to blame me for them. They are not MY opinions, they are the opinions of some of the top scholars of Islam. The next question I always get is 'who do you think the top scholars are?', and when I reply, I just get people saying that they are too strict as well. It makes me crazy when people try to find every conceivable way to make questionable actions allowed, and then turn around and call me strict for following Quran and Sunnah.

Now on to my next rant topic. Fashion. I find it very sad that more muslimahs write about what cute outfit they put together than about issues that Muslims face today. If I see one more polyvore outfit with skin tight jeans, an overly loud tight shirt covered by an equally loud fitted jacket, I'll scream (oh yes, and add the insane 5 inch high heel shoes in some ridiculous color). Why are we so obsessed with looking cute? That is reserved for our husbands and family, not for the rest of the world. If some spent half the time they do on their clothes on learning their deen they might be better off.

Now for the disclaimer. This was a rant. I was venting. I'm allowed that right? These are the kinds of things that you say in your head all the time but don't dare say out loud. I'm not looking for a fight, or any nasty comments, so just save it. Sometimes I just need to get it out, and I did.

13 comments:

Jamaican Hijabi said...

Assalamu alaikum Sis Jamilah, its perfectly ok to rant and vent, we all need to do that sometimes and blogging is a perfect way of venting :)

Lazeena Umm Yusuf said...

I feel you sis! It disappoints me that ALL the fashion blogs get the most visitors and when someone posts about an Islamically relevant issue then no one really reads or comments on it unless its controversial or they wanna start drama. People are drawn to drama unfortunately. I myself have come across a few blogs that are really into making women like men. In their eyes this is equality but really men and women are different by nature, and you know what? Bottom line is ALLAH SAYS, khalas, do we really need to argue with that? It annoys me that people feel the need to question everything and get clear cut arguments and responses for all that goes on. Just deal with it because your creator told you to! Ughh!! Now you have me ranting too LOL ;)

miseducation of the cushitic girl said...

Assalam Alaykum,
This world tries to assimilate too much. Forget those. They want to modernise the Religion of Allah. They are weak because the western influence has overtaken their Iman. Be strong ukhthi, and hold on to the authenticity. The Prophet sallalahu alayhi wasalam said there will come a time when holding on to Islam will be like holding on to hot coals. So if you don't feel some burning it means you're not 'strict' enough.
Shukran

iMuslimah said...

Everyone needs to vent once in a while. Having all those random and rogue thoughts in your mind for too long isn't healthy!

My personal rant is vulgar vocabulary in muslim blogs. It is a HUGE turn off.

My favorite kinds of muslimah blogs are the ones that take you through life's daily and ordinary activites and lessons....and how these women infuse their daily life with faith. There are some women out there who truly interanlize the meaning of being a muslimah mashAllah, and for me that is a true role model/source of support.

أم ترافيس said...

I feel exactly the same :D ((hugs)) and had to drastically reduce the nonsense that I read...

Lisa said...

We might not always agree, but keep doing what your doing brave sister. Some of our girls like fashion and come closer to Allah that way. And some like you are very devout, and talk about articles of importance. Either way, I find it to be a perfect da'wah. Love you very much.

jana z. said...

to be honest, i have to agree with you on the feminist deal....i dont have a beef with them. i just am not a feminist and never have been. im also in agreement with muslimah wearing tight clothing. i dont mind the clothing being attractive and not bland but not tight, revealing and shouting at the world to "look at me".

Random Muslima said...

assalaamu alaykum sis,

well, I feel for you...
But on the other hand I have grown old enough to see people don't view things from the same perspectives as I do and that we need to deal with our young ones with mercy...

Like this hijab blogging, if there was/if I knew what blogging was 10+ years ago, I could have done one. Alhamdulillah I did not.

I really truly believed that wearing long sleeves and covering my skin and having a headscraf was enough. I truly did. I did believe I could still look nice and all that (I have never done make-up though)...

it took from there about eight months during which I studied a lot about hijab along other things in Islam and in the end of the period there was no way you have got me out of my abaya...

When I get annoyed I always try to think where did I come from myself... alhamdulillah I have always been willing to go down in front of evidence, but I know its not that simple&easy for everyone, and I do believe we all have our weak points.

Maybe it is the Muslimah "is the glass half empty or half full" that when we see a Muslimah learning to hijaab and wearing s skirt, nice cardigan and a bun scarf, we either get the "oh my this is not hijaab ittakillaah!" or "mashaAllah she is trying to get there or may Allah guide her and make it easy for her, at least she is somehow on the way"

I always treasure in my heart one sister who must be somewhere in London now, who, at the time I did not do proper hijaab, bought me an outfit that completely covered me. She told me I looked like a princess even I know that was far from the truth but today I totally understand her point. May Allah bless her and reward her with all good.

Pixie said...

LOL I honestly started a hijab fashion blog just to get the hits to write about important Islamic issues:D

Jamilah said...

Pixie

And your fashion blog is appropriate... you don't talk about trying to make tight and sexy = hijab :)

Pixie said...

Why would anyone?

Shrugs.

Asiya said...

Jazakum Allaah khayran sisters! I can just feel the love of Allaah and the sunnah flowing forth from your words mashaa Allaah. May Allaah bless all of you and me with firmness upon this deen, ameen.

Yes, it can be frustrating when people arrogantly refuse the truth even though it's clear as day. Likewise our eman is not complete if we don't love all that Allaah loves and hate all that Allaah hates. But we have to remember that some people may not be able to see the truth as plain as day like others can. This is why we have to remember to have patience and be humble when offering da'wah to others. How many times are we reminded that more often than not, the best da'wah is our good example to others? Not trying to offend anyone, but some of the comments sound really judgmental, and can be a real put off to someone who you're trying to give da'wah to. Who's gonna take heed to the da'wah of someone who's being critical and judgmental?

Random Muslima said it best:

"When I get annoyed I always try to think where did I come from myself... alhamdulillah I have always been willing to go down in front of evidence, but I know its not that simple&easy for everyone, and I do believe we all have our weak points...Maybe it is the Muslimah "is the glass half empty or half full" that when we see a Muslimah learning to hijaab and wearing s skirt, nice cardigan and a bun scarf, we either get the "oh my this is not hijaab ittakillaah!" or "mashaAllah she is trying to get there or may Allah guide her and make it easy for her, at least she is somehow on the way..."

Sisters, let's be more patient with each other. Some of us have a lot of changing to do and it doesn't happen over night. It takes time.

Jannah said...

''That is reserved for our husbands and family, not for the rest of the world. If some spent half the time they do on their clothes on learning their deen they might be better off.''

That was a kick up the ***

(I feel ive been a little coonsumed wit clothes of late that ive felt my deen has been suffering...

The post seems to have come ata perfect time - Allhumdulillah


Jazakallah for a lovely read
x